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The WGAD initiated a review of the case involving newscaster Mancho Bibixy Tse in response to the 14 July 2018 LRWC letter identifying his trial and sentencing as unlawful. The WGAD sought and obtained submissions from Cameroon and invited LRWC’s response. Mancho Bibixy, a popular radio personality reporting on injustices suffered by Anglophone Cameroonians, was convicted by a military tribunal in April 2018 and subsequently sentenced to 15 years in prison and a fine of 268 million francs CFA (408,564 Euros). He was convicted on charges of “acts of terrorism”, “secession”, “propagation of false information”, “revolution”, “insurrection”, “contempt of public bodies and public servants”, and “hostility against the homeland”. LRWC filed submissions in response to those of Cameroon on 5 February 2019 and 14 February 2019 (prepared by Rob Lapper Q.C., Gail Davidson, and Felix Nkongho). LRWC submissions highlighted violations of rights to assembly, dissent, expression, fair trial; trial before a civilian court, legal aid, and freedom from discriminatory prosecution. LRWC also submitted that the charges violated the principle of legal certainty and the sentence failed to respect dignity and rights (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege apta), and failed to satisfy the principle of necessity (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine necessitate), the prerequisite of injustice (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine injuria), and the principle of guilt (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine culpa).

Source: lrwc.org

Cameroon’s two major cities were tense on Sunday and riot police were on the streets as security forces try to prevent protests before the results of the country’s controversial presidential election are released.

Dozens of riot police, some armed with machine guns, surrounded the activist and politician Kah Walla’s house on Sunday afternoon, preventing her from leaving to attend a peaceful demonstration planned in the centre of Douala, the economic capital.

The election results are due to be released on Monday morning, and are widely expected to show a resounding victory for Paul Biya, the country’s octogenarian president who put himself forward for a seventh term. The protest was billed as a march “to say goodbye to Biya” who, in his 36th year as president, spends a significant amount of his time on holiday in Geneva.

The opposition has said there was widespread fraud and voter intimidation in the 7 October election, and rejected the results early on despite the fact that they had not yet been released. Legal attempts to have the election rerun have failed.

Walla told the German public broadcaster, Deutsche Welle, last week that she was “bent on ousting the Biya regime”, and that the ballot box had been proven not to be a solution.

Anglophone rebels, who have been fighting for secession from the francophone majority in a spiraling conflict, boycotted the election and many English-speakers were unable to vote. Others who had fled to French-speaking regions faced raids and intimidation from the authorities.

Riot police were also posted to major streets and roundabouts in Douala and the capital, Yaoundé, on Sunday afternoon. Many internet users complained that they were unable to access Facebook and WhatsApp because they had been blocked.

A Reuters journalist, Josiane Kouagheu, was arrested while trying to cover the protests, according to Angela Quintal from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Source: the guardian

Author: Ruth Maclean 

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