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Traffic on the road between Buea and Kumba was paralyzed at the weekend following a heavy exchange of gunshots between French Cameroun security forces and Ambazonia fighters, sources have confirmed.

Sources said the Ambazonia fighters engaged French Cameroun security forces around Ekona blocking the road with similar battles taking place in Muyuka where a truck transporting cocoa was burnt down. Several vehicles were also burnt down as passengers were stranded.

A source traveling on the road told journalducameroun.com that they were escorted in a convoy through the road on Thursday morning by French Cameroun security forces in the midst of sporadic gunshots.

However, the situation degenerated early on Friday morning with heavy gunshots as separatist took control of parts of the road where they mounted roadblocks and were quick to post images on social media.

The tensed atmosphere comes to add to the woes of the local population especially those in Kumba who have gone for several days without electricity following a power breakdown on one of the transformers at the entrance to town.

Sources say workers of the electricity supply company would only get to the area to fix the technical fault when the security situation in the area must have improved.

Circulation was however partially restored on the road later on Sunday evening by security forces but the atmosphere remained tense.

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Source: journalducameroun

 

13-year-old Ching Randy was seeking refuge in the bush in Bafia around Muyuka in Fako Division of Cameroon’s South West Region when he was shot by soldiers.
« The boy could barely survive because he was shot with live bullets in the head » a source revealed to Mimi Mefo info.

His family immediately laid him to rest in the bushes yesterday Wednesday, October 17, 2018, for fear of being targeted by soldiers who are in the area for surveillance.

Ching Randy was a student of Government Bilingual High School GBHS Muyuka.

The education of many youths in Muyuka and the entire North West and South West Regions of Cameroon have been interrupted since the anglophone crisis escalated in 2016.
Muyuka is now a no-go-area as the military continues to battle with pro-independence fighters.
The town, like neighboring Ekona has remained deserted for months now.

Author: Mimi Mefo

Source: mimimefoinfos

On Monday Oct. 1, Cameroon’s Anglophone separatists marked the first anniversary of their self-declared breakaway state, the Federal Republic of Ambazonia (Southern Cameroons) in a somber mood. This was a marked difference from last year’s outpouring of celebrations and rhetoric by locals to unilaterally and symbolically the declare independence of Cameroon’s two English-speaking regions.

That was because both the Cameroon government and the separatists themselves had decreed a total lockdown for the date, Oct. 1 and beyond—with an eye on a contentious national election less than a week away.

In order to circumvent the type of massive mobilization of English speakers which saw thousands on the streets last year, the government placed restrictions on movement. In the north-west region, movement of persons from one sub-division to another was prohibited for a period of 48 hours, spanning from Sunday Sept. 30 to Monday Oct. 1. The public gathering of more than four people was also temporarily outlawed. This added to a dusk-to-dawn curfew earlier in place.

The governor of the north-west region, Lele Lafrique Tchoffo Deben Adolphe said the temporary restriction of movement of people was an “appropriate measure taken to guarantee security of its citizens and their properties before, during and after this day [Oct. 1].”

In the south-west region, similar restrictions, including shutting down of all businesses, suspension of socio-cultural meetings, closure of motor parks and ban on circulation, were instituted by local administrators.

AMINDEH BLAISE ATABONG
A deserted street in Buea, Cameroon

However, despite the measures, pro-independence English-speaking Cameroonians hoisted the blue-white flags of Ambazonia, and chanted their national anthem in some towns like Muyuka, Santa, Pinyin, Fontem, Ndu, Bafut, and even in far-off London where demonstrations took place.

For their part, separatists started enforcing a lockdown expected to end on Oct. 10, in a bid to frustrate political campaigns and a presidential poll on Oct. 7 in the two English-speaking regions.

The lockdown and the fear of being caught up in fresh clashes sparked the mass exit of people. Thousands of residents in the north-west and south-west regions have crossed over to the French-speaking parts of the country while others have gone abroad. In the south-west region alone, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) estimates that 246,000 people have been internally displaced, with a further 21,000 having cross over the border to Nigeria as refugees.

To enforce the lockdown, separatists have sabotaged bridges linking different localities and used trees to block major highways in the restive areas. On Sept. 30, no fewer than five vehicles were set ablaze along the Kumba-Mamfe road and the wreckages used to block the road. Gunshots were also heard in towns like Buea and Bamenda, while clashes between the warring parties get more frequent and deadly.

Armed separatists are determined to forestall any election in “their region.” However, Paul Atanga Nji, Minister of Territorial Administration has said the presidential poll will take place across all 360 sub-divisions of the country, including those in the embattled English-speaking regions.

The race to for president involves nine contenders, including incumbent Paul Biya, 85, who is seeking to extend his 36-year rule by another seven years. Biya is campaigning on his “force of experience” to floor his eight challengers in the Oct. 7 poll. There is little likelihood the incumbent won’t win. Besides the fact that Transparency International says elections in Cameroon are often marked by irregularities, the challengers will have to share opposition votes, giving Biya an edge in a one-round election in which one requires just the highest number of votes to emerge winner.

President Paul Biya has reiterated his resolve to end the conflict which started as a modest protest by English speakers against real and perceived marginalization by his Francophone-dominated government. While launching his bid for re-election in the northern city of Maroua, on Sept. 29, he claimed the state had overcome the toughest ordeal in the conflict-ridden regions.

By Amindeh Blaise Atabong in Buea Cameroon

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